DNS records and worldwide DNS propagation checker
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    • Resolved DNS: --
      Unresolved DNS: --
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Oberhausen, Germany
Deutsche Telekom AG 195.243.214.4
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Germany
DNS.Watch 84.200.69.80
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Berlin, Germany
AS250.net Foundation 194.150.168.169
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Oberhausen, Germany
Verizon Deutschland GmbH 194.172.160.4
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North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
PlusServer GmbH 80.237.197.14
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Germany
QSC AG 62.146.63.211
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Leipzig, Germany
Universitaet Leipzig 139.18.25.33
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Potsdam, Germany
e.discom Telekommunikation GmbH 82.193.241.125
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Frankfurt, Germany
Lennart Seitz 94.247.43.254
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Frankfurt am Main, Germany
DNS.WATCH 84.200.70.40
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Saarland, Germany
Probe Networks 82.96.64.2
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Moers, Germany
MK Netzdienste GmbH & Co. KG 178.210.102.12
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Esbjerg, Denmark
Mentor IT A/S 176.62.205.201
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Copenhagen, Denmark
Tele Danmark 80.196.100.209
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Midtjylland, Denmark
NM NET APS 83.97.97.3
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Glostrup, Denmark
Sentia Denmark A/S 86.58.175.11
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Glostrup, Denmark
Nianet A/S 93.176.83.154
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Tadworth, United Kingdom
Docklands Data Centre Ltd 81.24.196.76
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Macclesfield, United Kingdom
Blaze Networks Ltd 188.227.240.58
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Manchester, United Kingdom
M247 Ltd 194.187.251.67
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Byfleet, United Kingdom
4D Data Centres Ltd 37.209.219.30
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Manchester, United Kingdom
Ancar B Technologies Ltd 194.145.241.6
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London, United Kingdom
PNAP-LON Backbone Net 212.118.241.1
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Fulham, United Kingdom
InterNAP Network Services U.K. Limited 212.118.241.33
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Amsterdam, Netherlands
OpenTLD BV 80.80.80.80
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Amsterdam, Netherlands
Freedom Registry BV 80.80.81.81
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Weert, Netherlands
Pyton Communication Services B.V. 193.58.204.59
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The Hague, Netherlands
KPN 188.207.200.113
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Drachten, Netherlands
Enreach Netherlands B.V. 89.255.2.226
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Amsterdam, Netherlands
DigitalOcean LLC 37.139.11.137
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Bern, Switzerland
Swisscom AG 217.193.239.170
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Zurich, Switzerland
UPC Schweiz 62.2.121.84
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Madrid, Spain
Prioritytelecom Spain S.A. 212.230.255.1
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Zaragoza, Spain
Diputacion Provincial de Zaragoza 195.235.225.10
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Almeria, Spain
Vodafone Ono S.A. 62.81.238.230
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Paris, France
Online S.A.S. 163.172.107.158
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Paris, France
Association Gitoyen 80.67.169.12
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Paris, France
Association Gitoyen 80.67.169.40
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Lille, France
Completel SAS 83.145.86.7
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Innsbruck, Austria
nemox.net 83.137.41.9
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Kirchbach-Zerlach, Austria
IFO.net Internet Service GmbH 91.237.143.199
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Ireland
Daniel Cid 185.228.168.9
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Viana do Castelo, Portugal
CLOUDITY Network 185.83.212.30
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Tomar, Portugal
Almouroltec Servicos de Informatica e Internet Lda 109.71.42.228
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Note: Complete DNS Resolution may take up to 48 hours.

Check DNS Propagation

Recently changed your DNS records, switched web host, or started a new website: then you are at the right place! DNS Checker provides a free DNS lookup service to check Domain Name System records against a selected list of DNS servers located in multiple regions worldwide. Perform a quick DNS propagation lookup for any hostname, and check DNS data collected from all available DNS Servers to confirm that the DNS records are fully propagated.

What is DNS propagation?

DNS propagation is the time DNS changes take to be updated across the internet on the globe. It can take up to 72 hours to propagate worldwide. You can check your DNS propagation results from here.

How do DNS records propagate?

When you update your DNS records, it may take up to 72 hours for the changes to take effect. During this period, the ISPs worldwide update their DNS cache with new DNS information for your domain.

However, due to different DNS cache level, after DNS records changes, some of the visitors might be redirected to the old DNS server, for some time, and other can see the website from new DNS server, shortly after the changes. You can perform the A, AAAA, CNAME, and additional DNS records lookup.

Why DNS propagation takes time?

Suppose you changed your domain's nameservers, and you requested to open your domain on the web browser. Your request will not go to the hosting directly.

Each of the ISP nodes first checks its DNS cache, whether it has the DNS information for that domain. If it is not there, it will look it up to save it for future use to speed up the DNA lookup process.

Thus, the new nameservers will not propagate instantly - ISPs have different cache refreshing levels, so some will still have the old DNS information in their cache.

But if after that time interval, still, your new DNS changes are not reflecting, then you go for a DNS health check to ensure that your DNS changes are up to the mark and are following the standards.

How does the DNS process work?

Suppose you request to open the URL https://abc.com in your web browser's bar.

  1. The web browser first checks in its local cache whether it has the requested domain's IP address. If it's not present, then it will send the request to the Name Resolving Server.
  2. The Name Resolving Server checks its cache against that request. If it fails to find the requested domain's IP address, it will send that request to the Root Server.
  3. The Root Server only contains the server's IP address with TLD (Top Level Domain) related information. It will redirect the Name Resolving Server to the TLD server containing .com information.
  4. The TLD server provides the server's IP address (authoritative servers for requested URL https://abc.com) to the Name Resolving Server.
  5. The Name Resolving Server caches that information for a specific period (TTL) and passes that information to the requested's computer.
  6. The client's computer builds the connection with the authoritative server (containing the requested URL https://abc.com) for the requested content and caches the IP address's information in its browser for further use.

Why is DNS not propagating?

The ISPs across the world have a different caching level. The DNS client or the server may cache the information the DNS records in its DNS cache. That information is temporarily cached, and DNS servers will go for the updated DNS information when TTL (Time to Live) expires.

What will happen if the domain name does not exist?

The DNS server will return a name error, also known as an NXDomain response (for non-existent domain), to symbolize that the query's domain name does not exist.

What is the port used by DNS?

DNS uses both TCP and UDP port 53. However, the most frequently used port for DNS is UDP 53. That is used when the client's computer communicates with the DNS server for resolving the specific domain name. Be sure, when using the UDP 53 for DNS, the maximum size of the query packet is 512 bytes.

TCP 53 is used primarily for Zone Transfers and when the query packet exceeds 512 bytes. That is true when DNSSEC is used, which adds extra overhead to the DNS query packet.

What is DNS failure?

DNS failure means that the DNS server cannot convert the domain name into an IP address in a TCP/IP network. That failure may occur within the company's private network or the internet.

Which are the best DNS servers?

Some of the best public DNS servers are

  1. Google Public DNS:
    • IPv4:
      • Primary: 8.8.8.8
      • Secondary: 8.8.4.4
    • IPv6:
      • Primary: 2001:4860:4860::8888
      • Secondary: 2001:4860:4860::8844
  2. OpenDNS:
    • IPv4:
      • Primary: 208.67.222.222
      • Secondary: 208.67.220.220
  3. Quad9 (Malware Blocking Enabled):
    • IPv4:
      • Primary: 9.9.9.9
      • Secondary: 149.112.112.112
    • IPv6:
      • Primary: 2620:fe::fe
      • Secondary: 2620:fe::9
  4. DNS.Watch:
    • IPv4:
      • Primary: 84.200.69.80
      • Secondary: 84.200.70.40
    • IPv6:
      • Primary: 2001:1608:10:25::1c04:b12f
      • Secondary: 2001:1608:10:25::9249:d69b
  5. Comodo Secure DNS:
    • IPv4:
      • Primary: 8.26.56.26
      • Secondary: 8.20.247.20
  6. Cloudflare:
    • IPv4:
      • Primary: 1.1.1.1
      • Secondary: 1.0.0.1